Dating vioence

A number of studies have looked at the relationship between teen dating violence and community, family, peer, and individual risk factors.A lack of longitudinal data and a reliance on self-report data limits the causal connections that can be made between risk factors and teen dating violence.Preventing Dating Violence Dating violence can happen to any teen regardless of gender, race, socio-economic status, or whether or not they have experience with dating.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 4 adolescents experiences verbal, physical, emotional, or sexual abuse from a dating partner each year. Dating violence includes any behavior that is used to manipulate, gain control, gain power; cause fear, or make a dating partner feel bad about himself or herself.about 10 percent of high school students reported experiencing physical or sexual dating violence.

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Unhealthy, abusive, or violent relationships can have severe consequences and short- and long-term negative effect, especially on developing teens in violent relationships.

Additionally, youth who are victims of dating violence in high school are at higher risk for victimization during college.

In most cases the relationship between risk factors and teen dating violence listed below represent correlations, but not necessarily causality.

There are also risk factors that contribute to the likelihood of a teen becoming a perpetrator of dating violence.