Radioactive dating meteorite dating a unicorn

New data collected by secular researchers has confirmed what creation scientists discovered decades ago—geologists’ assumptions about radioactive decay are not always correct.

For a century, the radioactive decay of unstable elements into more stable ones has been used as a natural clock to estimate the age of earth materials.

Even the solar system has been dated using one of these systems, by measuring the amount of a decaying element and comparing it to the amount of its stable (decayed) daughter material in meteorites.

There are over forty such techniques, each using a different radioactive element or a different way of measuring them.

The smallest meteorites, called micrometeorites, range in size from a few hundred micrometres (μm) to as small as about 10 μm and come from the population of tiny particles that fill interplanetary space ( The effect of the final impact with the ground of meteoroids about a kilogram or less in mass is usually an anticlimax.

The fall can go unnoticed even by those near the impact site, the impact being signaled only by a whistling sound and a thud.

Many Christians have been led to distrust radiometric dating and are completely unaware of the great number of laboratory measurements that have shown these methods to be consistent.

Many are also unaware that Bible-believing Christians are among those actively involved in radiometric dating.